Sunday, June 27, 2010

A High-Risk Pregnancy by Trimester

We last spoke about chronic illness and weather, and then it went and got all humid on me and I fell into a black hole for a spell.

It occurred to me that while I’ve written about certain feelings about being pregnant, I haven’t written too much about the physical experience since I announced I was pregnant.

There is very little information out there on PCD and pregnancy—an outdated study from the early 1980s here or there, and beyond that, many of us patients rely on anecdotal experiences. I’ve gotten messages and e-mails asking for details: lung functions prior to pregnancy, medications, exercise, etc. I know I benefited from reading about this PCD pregnancy. I suspect many rare disease patients have the same problem.

Since we’re almost into the third trimester, I figured it was a good time to take stock of a high-risk, rare disease pregnancy through the first two trimesters. Even if you don’t have PCD, brochiectasis, or any of the other conditions I have, hopefully some of it will be useful anyway, particularly the emotions involved.

“The pregnancy has been challenging but the baby is doing great.”

That’s my quick and easy answer to people who know me and ask how things are going, and it really is the truth. Things have been going well, in that the baby is thriving, but I don’t make the mistake of equating things going “well” with things being “easy.”

The First Trimester*
*I’m going up to 18 weeks here, even though that spills into the second trimester, because 18 weeks was a real turning point for me.

Typical Pregnancy Stuff: I started getting queasy at about 6 weeks, and from about 8 weeks through 18, I had a lot of morning sickness (like, throwing up for hours each day, anywhere, anyplace). I was pretty tired, though many things could explain that. I’m reluctant to focus on this—after all we’ve been through I swore I’d never complain about pregnancy symptoms. Plus, unless you’re one of the people with really severe, constant, dehydrating nausea (and I know some people truly suffer with this) it’s not exactly a news flash to be pregnant and tired/sick to your stomach. I didn’t mind it that much because it made me feel like a “normal” pregnant person.

Other than that, we had a ton of ultrasounds, very frequent doctor appointments, and other than worries very early on, each scan showed normal growth. Our NT scan went great, all blood work looked good.

Illness-Related Stuff: A lot of the first 18 weeks were rough from an illness angle. I got sick in February and it didn’t fully resolve until May. I was hospitalized for a few days in late March and the weeks following that were the worst. Because my breathing was so labored and the medicines to help it are stimulants, I went weeks and weeks without sleeping more than 2-3 hours a night. When I did sleep my wheezing was so audible I’d hear it in my own light sleeping consciousness (and wake my husband with it) and my dreams were filled with the actual wheezing filling the room, dreams where I was suffocating. I was working a full time job and several part-time jobs (where no one knew I was pregnant yet) and with the lack of sleep and the infection, other medical conditions, the throwing up and, you know, being pregnant, it was a struggle.

Other illness stuff: my thyroid was monitored closely. I saw a nutritionist to make sure I was getting the right amounts of nutrients due to being sick to my stomach a lot and being celiac. My adrenals held up despite having to go back on steroids. I stayed on suppressive antibiotics the whole time, and had IV antibiotics for a short spell.

Emotions: All over the place. Thrilled beyond description to be pregnant. Terrified when I was in the hospital and on some serious meds that the baby would suffer (she didn’t, as many ultrasounds confirmed.) Guilty that something with my body could potentially harm her, when it was my job to protect her. Worried that the whole pregnancy would be like this, cycling in and out of the hospital. Cautious about telling people or “acting” too pregnant in case something happened. Lonely/isolated after being in “lockdown” months due to infection and not being able to contract anything from others (just work-home-work-hospital-home) but knowing it was worth it. Grateful and still in awe this was actually happening.

The Second Trimester*
*Starting this from week 18

Typical Pregnancy Stuff: The stomach problems died down around 18 weeks and now it’s mainly indigestion with very occasional sickness. I started feeling movement at 16 weeks (very light) and by 22 weeks, felt movement all the time. No matter how many times a day she kicks or squirms, no matter where I am or what I am doing, it always makes me smile. It is the best thing ever. Her kicks make my husband laugh out loud, and I could hear that sound forever.

The anatomy scan went well (the second time around) and all body parts and systems looked good. We found out we were having a girl(!). I had my glucose test quite early because of my steroid use, history, and increased risk, and passed it. (Yay!) We’ve had a bunch more ultrasounds and very frequent appointments (every week or two since early in the first trimester) and entered the “ultrasound at every appointment” realm at 25 weeks (and not the quick, in-office portable ones, the real deal.) She continues to do really well, measuring on time for everything and moving around a ton. We feel really comfortable with our high-risk maternal fetal medicine doctor, nurse practitioner, and nursing staff, and my lung doctor sees me more often than he did and is totally in the loop.

I’ve started to really show recently. I’ve had SPD (pelvic bone out of place, hip/thigh/back pain) for weeks now, but learned exercises and stretches to help it, and get in/out of cars and bed more slowly. Again, it’s not something that bothers me because it is also sort of normal to have those pains, and that is reassuring to me in its own way. My feet have started to swell but summertime flip-flops make that an easy fix.

Illness-Related Stuff: While some of the risks are much scarier, in some ways the second trimester is way better than the first.The winter/spring nastiness finally died down in May. Now I have really good days and really bad ones, and take advantage of the good ones. The humidity is way more challenging than it normally is for me. Some low oxygen readings prompted my team to have me get a pulse oximeter and take readings on bad days when I am not moving air. I learned a baby’s threshold for oxygen is much lower than ours, so a level in the low 90s or high 80s is problematic; mid-80s could be lethal. So I have a certain reading I am supposed to call them if I hit, and they’ll admit me and put me on oxygen. I’m still on (safe) suppressive antibiotics because a fear is an infection could trigger early labor but right now do not have an acute infection.

I also check my blood pressure a couple of times a day because at around 20 weeks, I started having high blood pressure. I’ve been schooled on the other warning signs of pre-eclampsia and keep an eye out for them. So far, it’s just high blood pressure and again I’ve been given a certain BP reading I shouldn’t go above, and if I do, I need to call, and need to call if I notice any of the other symptoms of pre-e. I try to stay on top of different readings without worrying unnecessarily or getting stressed out.

Other illness stuff: My thyroid is behaving itself, my intense food aversions have mellowed and I have no issues with managing the celiac stuff. I am tired, but what pregnant woman isn’t. Plus, days when I am not moving a lot of air or really work to breathe wear me out, but that is nothing new.

Emotions: Sheer joy. Intense relief when we hit the milestone of viability. Apprehension about keeping her safe and sound in there for at least another 10 weeks. Feeling powerless sometimes when I think about something wrong with me hurting her or causing early delivery. Encouraged that we have all sorts of plans and protocols in place should any of our major potential scenarios play out. Hopeful that things will go smoothly and she will get as close to full term as possible. Proud of my body for doing its job and allowing her to grow; frustrated when I allow myself to think it’s the same body that could cause real problems. Incredibly excited to meet her, and so grateful to get the chance to experience these milestones and feel her grow inside of me. Excited to get to the third trimester, and aware it will likely be an intense few months with even more monitoring, appointments, etc.

There are a lot of moving parts in any high-risk pregnancy (heck, in any pregnancy, high-risk or not!) but I feel like we have a good handle on the variables we can somewhat control, and I’ve accepted some things are beyond our control.

I wouldn’t trade a second of it, and most of what we’ve faced we were prepared for. So far, it could have been a lot more complicated, and we’re grateful for that. It is an amazing experience we doubted we’d ever have, and we try not to take a second of it for granted.

I’ll post more later on third-trimester experiences and concerns, but end with the most important point of all: the baby is doing great. With that in mind, everything else is manageable.


Edwin said...

Yikes - glad to hear things are going well. Hang in there - the haul is still a lot longer.

elizabeth said...

Wow, Laurie, you have such a great attitude and approach to all of this. Being pregnant is hard enough, but you're dealing with so much on top of the pregnancy itself. I'm in awe. I hope all continues to go well for you and the baby!

Never That Easy said...

Glad to hear that you and baby are both doing well (enough) at this point... Keeping my fingers crossed for you, and thanks, as always, for making so much sense.

Aviva said...

Yay, congrats on having a little girl growing inside you! I'm biased, of course, but little girls are just so much fun! (And little boys are too, in different ways, and I know either gender is a blessing, but little girls rock.)

I'm delighted to hear that you're doing well in this pregnancy, all things considered. I hope the last bit is even better for both you and baby.

It sounds like you have a wonderful team working with you and you're in great hands and doing what needs to be done. Hang in there -- there's a lot about even a "normal" pregnancy that isn't a lot of fun, but you've got a fabulous attitude that I know will carry you through it. And then the fun really begins when you have that little one to snuggle and hold, which I'm hopeful you'll be able to do from day one.

Barbara K. said...

Congratulations Laurie. Your awareness is inspiring. Your child will be lucky to have such a strong and insightful mother.

Maria Meinholz said...

Hi Laurine,

Thank you so much for taking the time and write about your personal story, it really is very inspiring for me.

I am 35 years old and also have PCD. I can for sure relate with you in many ways especially when you said "I’d hear it in my own light sleeping consciousness (and wake my husband with it) and my dreams were filled with the actual wheezing filling the room, dreams where I was suffocating", this is one of the reason I don't take naps during the day! My husband and I are trying to get pregnant and, of course, with that comes many questions in my mind that I can't find a lot of answers to because of the lack of information on the web. So anyway, today when I woke up I said to myself, there has to be somebody out there with my same condition that has written something about being pregnant with PCD - and sure enough, there you were!!! I can't tell you how happy I am to have found you and also to know that you are doing so well (under the circumstance). I definitely will keep you in my prayers and also a close eye on your blog. I wish you all the best in your final trimester - when are you due?

My best regards,
Maria Meinholz

EMR said...

Yes pregnancy is a difficult period...also one that needs caution and care.Good that there are guidelines here for all to know how to deal with the special situation.

Powered by blogger. Customized by PinkDezine.